dyslexia and work place

Dyslexia and Autism in the Work Force

Dyslexia and autism have a place in the work force. Although this video is a year old, I for some reason just came across it. It is a beautifully articulated answer about how people with different abilities find their individual purposes in this world. We all are created differently for different purposes. It is important to remember this and celebrate it. Individual’s with dyslexia and autism also have strengths to draw upon. Neil deGrasse Tyson answers this little girl’s question about whether or not he works with people with individuals with dyslexia fantastically.

Often times it seems people hear the term disability and hear short coming then sell the individual short. In reality however, we all have shortcomings. None of us are perfect. Also the work force is such a diverse place. It is meant for all the vast intellects, social skills, gross motor skills, doers, and problem solvers. Also many of the labels like ‘dyslexia’ and ‘autism’ are broad. The people within them fall into different categories and function on different levels, just like ‘brunettes’ or ‘swimmers.’ They are all broad labels until you know the individual it is hard to truly know the full potential or the lasting impact they can do.

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Learning disabilities

Learning Disabilities: Definitions & What to Know

Learning Disabilities are a disorder that is defined as a permanent problem that affects a person with average intelligence, in a way that he/she receives, stores, and processes information. There are physiological differences in those with learning disabilities, and this impacts their learning.

No one knows the exact cause of a learning disability. One widely accepted theory is that learning disabilities are a result of subtle disturbances in the brain structure and function. The experts, however, agree that learning disabilties can be caused by hereditary, complications during pregnancy and birth, along with incidents after birth, such as a head injury, or lead poisoning. An individual with a learning disability can also have other disabilities.

Some of the terminologies connected with having Learning Disabilties are listed below along with an example of the symptoms:

  • Dyslexia-letters or words can be written or pronounced backwards
  • Dyscalculia– difficulty learning to count by 2’s, 3’s, 5’s
  • Dysgraphia– difficulty writing and organizing ideas on paper
  • Dyspraxia– difficulty with fine motor skills
  • Auditory Processing Disorder– difficulty interpreting auditory information.
  • Visual Processing Disorder– difficulty interpreting visual information such as
    distinguishing between letters like h/n
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder– difficulty concentrating and focusing

Academic curriculum and environment can have a tremendous impact on determining if a child is at risk of becoming a child with learning disabilities (LD).

Learning disabilities

Curriculum factors:

  • School work is mismatched with uneven abilities
  • The child is taught at a level above what he can comprehend
  • The style of teaching does not match the child’s learning style

Because of these problems, students with LD become frustrated, they find it extremely hard to catch up. These difficulties can make a student give up and create behavior problems.

Some possible solutions to these problems:

  • Dictate essays
  • Read by listening to books on tape
  • Reduce the number of words or concepts the student must memorize
  • Teach memory tricks
  • Translate difficult text
  • Make concrete models of difficult concepts.

Modifications must be made in order to reduce the strain caused by these students difference in learning style.

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teaching phonics

Learning Disabilities: Learning the Facts

Learning Disabilities cover a wide variety of symptoms, causes, outcomes, and treatments. This can make it difficult to diagnose or to pinpoint the causes. Learning Disabilities can be divided up into three broad categories. These include: developmental speech and language disorders, academic skills disorders, and Other (includes certain coordination disorders and learning handicaps not covered by the other terms). Each one of these categories includes a number of more specific disorders. Since each child with LD, learning disorders, is so different, there futures with the disability are different as well.

Learning disabilities

There are many early warning signs of future learning disabilities. One of which is speech delays. Kids with weaknesses in oral language have difficulty both with understanding what is said to them and with formulating responses. It can lead to further speech problems, like if a child often failing to understand what an adult say, missing important points, and misinterpreting directions. There are early intervention services available for many children, which can help the child to achieve their verbal goals.  Your local Division of Developmental Disabilities can direct you to the appropriate system to get a baby or toddler evaluated.

  • Although it is possible students will out grow this, there has been much research done on the correlation between speech-delayed preschoolers and students with learning disabilities.
  • Early identification is the best way to prevent further disabilities
  • 
Learning Disabilities affect many children and adults in our community.
  • Some students may be able to reach there full potential in a total inclusion environment, but many need extra assistance from resource rooms or special education classrooms.  The students needs should be truly considered in order for them to be best prepared for school and eventually for a successful career.  The child’s classroom needs and educational goals should be outlined in their IEP, Individual Education Plan.
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ADHD Attention Deficit Disorder

ADHD: Fact, Fiction, and What Can Help

When your child is diagnosed with ADHD, so many questions can arise. Here are some facts to help you understand Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder better:

Where to Get Help:

  • Ask your doctor
  • See a Developmental Pediatrician
  • Talk to your child’s school psychologist

Signs of ADHD:

  • Be easily distracted, miss details, forget things, and frequently switch from one activity to another
  • Have difficulty maintaining focus on one task
  • Become bored with a task after only a few minutes, unless doing something enjoyable
  • Have difficulty focusing attention on organizing and completing a task or learning something new
  • Trouble completing or turning in homework assignments, often losing things (e.g., pencils, toys, assignments) needed to complete tasks or activities
  • Not seem to listen when spoken to
  • Daydream, become easily confused, and move slowly
  • Have difficulty processing information as quickly and accurately as others
  • Struggle to follow instructions
  • Fidget and squirm in their seats
  • Talk nonstop
  • Dash around, touching or playing with anything and everything in sight
  • Have trouble sitting still during dinner, school, and story time
  • Be constantly in motion
  • Have difficulty doing quiet tasks or activities
  • Seem impatient
  • Blurt out inappropriate comments, show their emotions without restraint, and act without regard for consequences
  • Have difficulty waiting for things they want or waiting their turns in games

ADHD is:

  • A Neurobehavioral Disorder
  • Syptoms often present before age seven
  • Often Characterized by lack of focus, impulsiveness, and sometimes hyperactivity
  • Believed to effect 3-5% of children globally with 2-16% diagnosed
  • Diagnosed 2-4 x’s more in boys
  • It is normally tested on rating scales

ADHD is NOT:

  • Although it can be associated with other disorders, it does not mean your child has one of these disorders
  • Mean your child will go down a bad path in life
  • A life-long sentence. Only 30-50% of those with it continue having issues with it into adulthood.

Some Things to Help:

ADHD Attention Deficit Disorder

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learning disabilities

Learning Disabilities: Definition, Rights, & Education

Learning disabilities are defined by IDEA, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as:  A disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations, including conditions such as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia.

learning disabilities

Rights of Those with Learning Disabilities

Those with learning disabilities have rights, such as:

  • Entitled to an Individualized Education Plan (IEP)
  • An education in the least restrictive environment (LRE)

Four Key Components to Educating Those with Learning Disabilities

  • Motivation: Helping a child to succeed without their own motivation is impossible. Find what makes them tick or what is really going to motivate them to reaching for a better education and truly overcoming their learning disability. This may mean positive reinforcements that can be provided by the teacher or in cooperation with the parent. If money is an issue, think outside the box. Motivation can come in all shapes and sizes and once the child experiences success, they are more likely to try again without any external motivation.
  • Acquisition: This simply refers to them acquiring the information. People have all sorts of different learning styles, so make sure that you are teaching the child how they learn. Do they need hands on projects? Do they need flashcards? Learning comes in all shapes and sizes.
  • Retention: Many individuals with Learning Disabilities have a hard time remembering and recalling information. This means constant review is necessary
  • Performance: Having a child know information is great, but they also need to be able to apply the information both to tests and into the real world
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