lessons for learning math

Lesson Plan Examples: Teaching Money to Students with Mental Retardation

The following include lesson plan examples for teaching money concepts, but it could be slightly modified for other math lessons. When teaching any child, it is important to consider what their needs are, strengths are, and the ways in which they learn. Does the child need hands on materials? Can they universalize subjects? Many students with mental retardation cannot. This means they need to learn with real money and in real life situations. That way once the concept is mastered the student can apply it to their life and not just fill out worksheets on it. Consider taking them on a field trip to practice or encourage parents to let the child help out when buying stuff from a grocery store or clothing store. It might also help to peek the child’s interest by using items they are interested in to purchase. For example, if they are into animals, talk about all the various expenses and help them to figure out shopping and care expenses. When looking at this example of a math lesson plan, think of how to make slight alterations to work with your specific kid on their specific need.

lessons for learning math

Curriculum Guides for Mathematics

Goal:

Students will be able to pay bills, including grocery and clothing, to increase independence in preparation for graduation.

Objectives:

  1. Student will be able to identify and label money, and then identify value of each piece.
  2. Student will be able to add their money in order to know amount possess.
  3. Student will be able to understand concept of spending less than they possess.
  4. Student will be able to add together items to prepare for check out.
  5. Student will pay for shopping without assistance.

Day One:

Objective: Student will be able to identify and label money.

Activity: Students will work with the money through flashcards and actual play to work toward identifying money.

Assessment:Student will identify the names and then the value of money pieces.

Day Two:

Objective: Student will be able to add their money in order to know amount possess.

Activity: Student will add money, including coins and dollars on work sheets, computer, and with actual money.

Assessment: Student will be able to add together money

 Day Three:

Objective: Student will be able to understand concept of spending less than they possess.

Activity: Students will participate in mock purchasing to better understand value of money.

Assessment: Student will pick out items costing less than what he/she possess.

Day Four:

Objective: Student will be able to add together items to prepare for check out.

Activity: Students will work on adding costs together with calculator or other tools available.

Assessment: Student will pick out two plus items at a time costing less than what he/she possess.

Day Five:

Objective: Student will pay for shopping without assistance.

Activity: Students will be able to pick out items they can afford and then pay for them independently at mock shopping center.

Assessment: Students will be able to pick out items they can afford and then pay for them independently.

Additional Activities

  1. Students take a field trip to a bank or store.
  2. Students have a mock money system of earning and spending.
  3. Student’s can do coloring pages, computer games, and other projects focused on money.

Additional Strategies/Suggestions

  1. Start with simple ideas, and then add on when student is ready. For example, students will probably learn the names of specific money and then add value to the coins and dollars.
  2. Students can work on matching/grouping money in order to work on identifying pieces.
  3. Students may find it easiest to begin with coins and then introduce the paper values of the dollar.
  4. Encourage involvement of all members that the students engages with in order to better benefit their success.

Resources

Gubler, Warren. (2001). Teaching the Value of a Dollar. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2001/01/18/hartman/main265268.shtml

Money Investor. (2004). Basic Money Skills. Retrieves February 20,2006, from http://www.moneyinvestor.com

Thomas, G. E. (1996). Teaching students with mental retardation: A life goal curriculum planning approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice.

art therapy

Art Therapy Working With Emotional Disabilities

Children who have emotional disabilities may need many options when it comes therapy. Art Therapy is one possibility. It is a treatment that children can start at a very early stage of life and continue throughout adulthood. Art therapy is something personal, so that the strategies learned could eventually be used in their own schedules to help get through the daily grinds of life.

art therapy

Educational Purpose

  • Individual’s need help overcoming emotional problems by connecting with their feelings and others through art
  • This connection can allow students to move forward and promotes personal growth

Teacher/Student Activities:

  • Students are normally in a group setting
  • Art allows students to express themselves, even when there are typical communication barriers and/or the individual is shy
  • After the students have expressed themselves through art, have the student describe the picture. It is often easier for the students to talk about their picture than themselves

Student Assessment/Accommodations

  • This is a medium for therapy that should be individualized and can be useful when the child enjoys doing art
  • If the child does seem to be connecting through art, it is important to see how they trust their environment and what they are willing to share about their art

Resources:

http://www.artsintherapy.com/

Newcomer, P. L. (2003).Understanding and teaching emotionally disturbed children and adolescents ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-ed.

teaching standards

Teaching Standards: Different Agencies Requirements

The following is a series of lists that outline the requirements of teaching standards for different agencies. As a teacher, there are many requirements to meet and exceed. Here’s a shortly compiled list of some of the things required of a classroom teacher.

teaching standards

National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, NBPTS

  • Demonstrate that teaching practice meets the exceptional Needs Standards*
  • Have access to at least 3+ student with exceptional needs prior to submission/ Field experience
  • Summit instructional material/videotape showing interactions w/ students
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in communication/literacy lessons
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in Social Development lessons
  • Use of assessments
  • Collaboration

AZ Department of Education Teaching Standards

  • Have access to at least 3+ student with exceptional needs prior to submission/ Field experience
  • A valid fingerprint card
  • Ed. Courses from accredited institution/ Appropriate Training with demonstrated knowledge
  • Pass Eligibility tests/extra training levels

Council for Exceptional Children, CEC, Teaching Standards

  • Have access to at least 3+ student with exceptional needs prior to submission/ Field experience
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in communication/literacy lessons
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in Social Development lessons
  • Use of assessments
  • Collaboration
  • Ed. Courses from accredited institution/ Appropriate Training with demonstrated knowledge
  • Articulate personal philosophy of Sp. Ed.
  • Relate levels of support to needed individual
  • Use research-supported methods for academic and non-academic instruction of individuals with disabilities
  • Learn necessary skills for teaching children with special needs, including but not limited to, adoption of technology, material, and pace
  • Uses/ supports Learning environments and social interactions
  • Use effective communication
  • Demonstrate instructional planning
  • Demonstrate Professional and Ethical practice
  • Teacher uses variety in instructional strategy

Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium, INTASC, Teaching Standards

  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in communication/literacy lessons
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in Social Development lessons
  • Use of assessments
  • Collaboration
  • Teacher uses variety in instructional strategy
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in communication/literacy lessons
  • Demonstrate ability to engage/support students in Social Development lessons
  • Use of assessments
  • Collaboration
  • Relate levels of support to needed individual
  • Teacher continually evaluates self. Teacher understands how students differ and adapt curriculum
  • Teacher uses variety in instructional strategy. Instruction based on teacher’s knowledge, students, community, curriculum
  • Learn necessary skills for teaching children with special needs, including but not limited to, adoption of technology, material, and pace
  • Uses/ supports Learning environments and social interactions. Use effective communication

No Child Left Behind, NLCB, Teaching Standards

  • Use of assessments
  • Collaboration
  • Ed. Courses from accredited institution/ Approp. Training with demonstrated knowledge
  • Uses/ supports Learning environments and social interactions
  • Use effective communication
  • Demonstrate Professional and Ethical practice
  • Passing eligibility test/ Extra training levels
Baby Brain Map

Baby Brain Development: A Map to Learning

Here’s a fun Interactive Site that let’s you truly explore baby brain development. It gives you questions, answers, and what to do to help your child reach there full potential. It looks like a great resource! Have fun exploring and learning to help your child grow!

Baby Brain Development

The Brain Map was adapted in 2006 by ZERO TO THREE from BrainWonders, a collaborative project (1998-2001) between Boston University School of Medicine, Erikson Institute and ZERO TO THREE http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/brain-development/baby-brain-map.html

finding success writing

Finding Success in Writing with Learning Disabilities

Students with learning disabilities are often challenged throughout the language arts, so it should be no surprise that written language can be challenging for them. The following ideas are strategies that can be used to simplify learning to write so that a child with learning disabilities can find success:

Strategies that can be used to simplify learning for children with disabilities

  • Break writing down into three main concept: Basic mechanics (including handwriting, sentence structure, spelling, and punctuation), Content (vocabulary, organization, quality, clarity), and higher-level writing (revision process and planning).
  • Students need to learn basic rules such as correct letter formation and capitalizing proper nouns.
  • Practicing is an essential element of making a successful writer.
  • Focus on learning tasks only a couple at a time. Students with learning disabilities may have problem with spacing letters or spelling focus on these before moving onto more complex things.
  • Remember that writing takes a lot of coordination and various mental and physical processes, because of this, students may need to learn at a slower pace.
  • If a particular child appears to need extra help, find resource teachers, aides, therapists, or family that will work with the child. The sooner the child gets help the more successful and main streamed they can be later on.
  • Creative writing, like in journaling, can be a simple measure to increase the students practice without focusing on content.
  • Children can practice proofreading focusing on one specific item like punctuation or spelling. This can help the child to recognize problems and become more self-sufficient at writing.